Probate

28 March 2017

Testator lacked capacity to execute estate planning documents

In Texas Capital Bank v. Asche, the Dallas Court of Appeals affirmed the probate court’s judgment that a series of estate planning documents should be set aside. The judgment was based on jury findings that the testator lacked sufficient mental capacity to execute the documents. This was not the classic case of challenged will executed in the days or weeks before death. In this case, the challenge was to a series of wills, codicils, and trust documents executed over a period of about 13 years. This was not an easy task for the contestants, given the long time period and […]
17 January 2017

Court may construe a will before it is admitted to probate

Many will contests involve a challenge to the validity of a will, such as claims it did not meet formality requirements or that the testator lacked capacity or was subjected to undue influence. However, sometimes the primary dispute is how to interpret one or more provisions of a will. I find this to be most often the case when the will is not prepared by an experienced estate planing lawyer. Unfortunately, homemade wills often contain confusing, unclear, or outright contradictory provisions.  Or a testator may have an excellent will drafted by a lawyer, only to make a homemade codicil that […]
18 October 2016

Estate of Matthews: Successful challenge to marriage

A fairly common scenario in estate litigation involves a claim from a widow to a share of an estate.  Often there is a claim of a common law marriage. Texas recognizes common law marriage under some circumstances.  Once established, a common law marriage is effectively the same as a formal marriage. Even a formal marriage can be challenged, under limited circumstances.  After a person’s death, an interested person may petition a court to annual a marriage entered into less than three years before death, by proving that: on the date the marriage occurred, the decedent did not have the mental capacity to: […]
29 April 2015

Court of appeals upholds removal of executor

In Estate of Montemayor, the San Antonio Court of Appeals considered a challenge to the probate court’s removal of an independent executor.  Such removals have become more difficult since the Texas Supreme Court’s opinion in Kappus v. Kappus. The probate court removed the executor because it found that, after over three years, he had not effectively pursued resolution of the estate.  That alone is not necessarily grounds for removal.  But the sole asset of the estate was a house and lot. The executor moved into the house and told one of the beneficiaries that “he was going to keep the […]
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